Can you parallel non-inverter generators?

  • Post last modified:January 5, 2023
  • Reading time:6 mins read

Yes, non-inverter generators can be run in parallel with other non-inverter generators. 

However, not all non-inverter generators are capable of being run in parallel. This is because some non-inverter generators do not have the necessary controls and connections to be connected to other generators.

Key Takeaways

  1. Non-inverter generators can be run in parallel with other non-inverter generators, but not all non-inverter generators are capable of being run in parallel.
  2. It is not possible to connect a non-parallel inverter generator with a parallel-ready generator.
  3. Non-inverter generators may have limitations in parallel operation, such as differences in output, difficulty in combining power outputs, and reduced efficiency compared to inverter generators.

There may be differences in the output of each generator that make it difficult to combine their power outputs effectively.

In general, it is best to consult the manufacturer of the non-inverter generators in question to determine whether they can be run in parallel and, if so, how to do so safely and effectively.

Related: A complete guide on paralleling generators

Can you connect a non-parallel inverter generator with a parallel-ready generator?

No, you can’t.

Connecting a non-parallel inverter generator with a parallel-ready generator is generally impossible. This is because non-parallel inverters and parallel ready generators are designed to operate differently and incompatible.

Non-parallel inverter generators are designed to operate independently without being connected to other generators. They typically do not have the necessary controls and connections to be connected to other generators, and attempting to do so may damage the generator or create safety hazards.

In contrast, parallel-ready inverter generators are specifically designed to be connected to other generators in parallel operation. They have the necessary controls and connections to allow multiple generators to be connected together and operated in unison.

It is important to carefully consider the type of generator you are using and its capabilities before attempting to connect it to other generators. Connecting a non-parallel inverter generator with a parallel-ready generator is likely ineffective and potentially dangerous. It is best to consult the manufacturer of the generators in question for more information on their capabilities and how to use them safely.

Limitation of non-inverter generator in parallel operations

  1. Not all non-inverter generators are designed to be run in parallel. This means that some non-inverter generators may need the necessary controls and connections to be connected to other generators. 
  2. Non-inverter generators typically do not produce a stable, consistent output. This can make it difficult to effectively combine the power outputs of multiple non-inverter generators, as differences in output may cause fluctuations in the overall power supply. 
  3. The parallel operation of non-inverter generators may not be as efficient as the parallel operation of inverter generators. Inverter generators are designed to produce a stable, consistent output, making combining their power outputs easier. 
  4. Non-inverter generators are typically louder and heavier than inverter generators, which can be a disadvantage in some applications. 
  5. Non-inverter generators may be able to produce a different level of power output than inverter generators, which can limit their usefulness in some applications.

Related: Inverter vs normal generator – Head to head comparison

Why some non-inverter generators may not be suitable for parallel operation

There are several reasons why some non-inverter generators may not be suitable for parallel operation. One reason is that not all non-inverter generators are designed to be run in parallel. This means that some non-inverter generators may need the necessary controls and connections to be connected to other generators.

Another reason is that non-inverter generators typically do not produce a stable, consistent output. This can make it difficult to effectively combine the power outputs of multiple non-inverter generators, as differences in output may cause fluctuations in the overall power supply.

Non-inverter generators may be able to produce a different level of power output than inverter generators. Inverter generators are designed to produce a stable, consistent output, making combining their power outputs easier. This can make inverter generators a better choice for applications where parallel operation is necessary.

Overall, the limitations of non-inverter generators in parallel operation make them less suitable for some applications compared to inverter generators. It is essential to carefully consider these limitations and consult the manufacturer of the non-inverter generators in question before attempting to run them in parallel.